The Independent

Mumps cases at highest level in a decade as a result of ‘anti-vax information’, says government

The Independent

The number of recorded cases of mumps has soared to its highest level in a decade, new figures have shown.

Mumps is a contagious infection that causes the glands on the side of the face to swell painfully, the NHS explains.

A person’s risk of contracting mumps can be reduced exponentially by having an MMR vaccine, which protects against mumps, measles and rubella.

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According to provisional data released by Public Health England (PHE), in 2019 5,042 cases of mumps were confirmed in England.

This marks the highest number of confirmed cases in 10 years, with just over a fifth of that figure (1,066) confirmed in 2018.

PHE warned that the increased prevalence of mumps cases is likely to continue this year.

The agency reported 546 confirmed cases of the viral infection in January 2020, a notable increase from the 191 cases confirmed across the country in January 2019.

PHE stated that the “steep rise in cases in 2019 has been largely driven by outbreaks in universities and colleges”.

“Many of the cases in 2019 were seen in the so-called ‘Wakefield cohorts’ – young adults born in the late nineties and early 2000s who missed out on the MMR vaccine when they were children,” the governmental organisation explained.

“These cohorts are now old enough to attend college and university and are likely to continue fuelling outbreaks into 2020.”

Shape Created with Sketch. Health news in pictures

Show all 40

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Shape Created with Sketch. Health news in pictures

1/40 Thousands of emergency patients told to take taxi to hospital

Thousands of 999 patients in England are being told to get a taxi to hospital, figures have showed. The number of patients outside London who were refused an ambulance rose by 83 per cent in the past year as demand for services grows

Getty

2/40 Vape related deaths spike

A vaping-related lung disease has claimed the lives of 11 people in the US in recent weeks. The US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention has more than 100 officials investigating the cause of the mystery illness, and has warned citizens against smoking e-cigarette products until more is known, particularly if modified or bought “off the street”

Getty

3/40 Baldness cure looks to be a step closer

Researchers in the US claim to have overcome one of the major hurdles to cultivating human follicles from stem cells. The new system allows cells to grow in a structured tuft and emerge from the skin

Sanford Burnham Preybs

4/40 Two hours a week spent in nature can improve health

A study in the journal Scientific Reports suggests that a dose of nature of just two hours a week is associated with better health and psychological wellbeing

Shutterstock

5/40 Air pollution linked to fertility issues in women

Exposure to air from traffic-clogged streets could leave women with fewer years to have children, a study has found. Italian researchers found women living in the most polluted areas were three times more likely to show signs they were running low on eggs than those who lived in cleaner surroundings, potentially triggering an earlier menopause

Getty/iStock

6/40 Junk food ads could be banned before watershed

Junk food adverts on TV and online could be banned before 9pm as part of Government plans to fight the “epidemic” of childhood obesity. Plans for the new watershed have been put out for public consultation in a bid to combat the growing crisis, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said

PA

7/40 Breeding with neanderthals helped humans fight diseases

On migrating from Africa around 70,000 years ago, humans bumped into the neanderthals of Eurasia. While humans were weak to the diseases of the new lands, breeding with the resident neanderthals made for a better equipped immune system

PA

8/40 Cancer breath test to be trialled in Britain

The breath biopsy device is designed to detect cancer hallmarks in molecules exhaled by patients

Getty

9/40 Average 10 year old has consumed the recommended amount of sugar for an adult

By their 10th birthdy, children have on average already eaten more sugar than the recommended amount for an 18 year old. The average 10 year old consumes the equivalent to 13 sugar cubes a day, 8 more than is recommended

PA

10/40 Child health experts advise switching off screens an hour before bed

While there is not enough evidence of harm to recommend UK-wide limits on screen use, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health have advised that children should avoid screens for an hour before bed time to avoid disrupting their sleep

Getty

11/40 Daily aspirin is unnecessary for older people in good health, study finds

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine has found that many elderly people are taking daily aspirin to little or no avail

Getty

12/40 Vaping could lead to cancer, US study finds

A study by the University of Minnesota’s Masonic Cancer Centre has found that the carcinogenic chemicals formaldehyde, acrolein, and methylglyoxal are present in the saliva of E-cigarette users

Reuters

13/40 More children are obese and diabetic

There has been a 41% increase in children with type 2 diabetes since 2014, the National Paediatric Diabetes Audit has found. Obesity is a leading cause

Reuters

14/40 Most child antidepressants are ineffective and can lead to suicidal thoughts

The majority of antidepressants are ineffective and may be unsafe, for children and teenager with major depression, experts have warned. In what is the most comprehensive comparison of 14 commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs to date, researchers found that only one brand was more effective at relieving symptoms of depression than a placebo. Another popular drug, venlafaxine, was shown increase the risk users engaging in suicidal thoughts and attempts at suicide

Getty

15/40 Gay, lesbian and bisexual adults at higher risk of heart disease, study claims

Researchers at the Baptist Health South Florida Clinic in Miami focused on seven areas of controllable heart health and found these minority groups were particularly likely to be smokers and to have poorly controlled blood sugar

iStock

16/40 Breakfast cereals targeted at children contain ‘steadily high’ sugar levels since 1992 despite producer claims

A major pressure group has issued a fresh warning about perilously high amounts of sugar in breakfast cereals, specifically those designed for children, and has said that levels have barely been cut at all in the last two and a half decades

Getty

17/40 Potholes are making us fat, NHS watchdog warns

New guidance by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the body which determines what treatment the NHS should fund, said lax road repairs and car-dominated streets were contributing to the obesity epidemic by preventing members of the public from keeping active

PA

18/40 New menopause drugs offer women relief from ‘debilitating’ hot flushes

A new class of treatments for women going through the menopause is able to reduce numbers of debilitating hot flushes by as much as three quarters in a matter of days, a trial has found. The drug used in the trial belongs to a group known as NKB antagonists (blockers), which were developed as a treatment for schizophrenia but have been “sitting on a shelf unused”, according to Professor Waljit Dhillo, a professor of endocrinology and metabolism

REX

19/40 Doctors should prescribe more antidepressants for people with mental health problems, study finds

Research from Oxford University found that more than one million extra people suffering from mental health problems would benefit from being prescribed drugs and criticised “ideological” reasons doctors use to avoid doing so.

Getty

20/40 Student dies of flu after NHS advice to stay at home and avoid A&E

The family of a teenager who died from flu has urged people not to delay going to A&E if they are worried about their symptoms. Melissa Whiteley, an 18-year-old engineering student from Hanford in Stoke-on-Trent, fell ill at Christmas and died in hospital a month later.

Just Giving

21/40 Government to review thousands of harmful vaginal mesh implants

The Government has pledged to review tens of thousands of cases where women have been given harmful vaginal mesh implants.

Getty

22/40 Jeremy Hunt announces ‘zero suicides ambition’ for the NHS

The NHS will be asked to go further to prevent the deaths of patients in its care as part of a “zero suicide ambition” being launched today

Getty

23/40 Human trials start with cancer treatment that primes immune system to kill off tumours

Human trials have begun with a new cancer therapy that can prime the immune system to eradicate tumours. The treatment, that works similarly to a vaccine, is a combination of two existing drugs, of which tiny amounts are injected into the solid bulk of a tumour.

Nephron

24/40 Babies’ health suffers from being born near fracking sites, finds major study

Mothers living within a kilometre of a fracking site were 25 per cent more likely to have a child born at low birth weight, which increase their chances of asthma, ADHD and other issues

Getty

25/40 NHS reviewing thousands of cervical cancer smear tests after women wrongly given all-clear

Thousands of cervical cancer screening results are under review after failings at a laboratory meant some women were incorrectly given the all-clear. A number of women have already been told to contact their doctors following the identification of “procedural issues” in the service provided by Pathology First Laboratory.

Rex

26/40 Potential key to halting breast cancer’s spread discovered by scientists

Most breast cancer patients do not die from their initial tumour, but from secondary malignant growths (metastases), where cancer cells are able to enter the blood and survive to invade new sites. Asparagine, a molecule named after asparagus where it was first identified in high quantities, has now been shown to be an essential ingredient for tumour cells to gain these migratory properties.

Getty

27/40 NHS nursing vacancies at record high with more than 34,000 roles advertised

A record number of nursing and midwifery positions are currently being advertised by the NHS, with more than 34,000 positions currently vacant, according to the latest data. Demand for nurses was 19 per cent higher between July and September 2017 than the same period two years ago.

REX

28/40 Cannabis extract could provide ‘new class of treatment’ for psychosis

CBD has a broadly opposite effect to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active component in cannabis and the substance that causes paranoia and anxiety.

Getty

29/40 Over 75,000 sign petition calling for Richard Branson’s Virgin Care to hand settlement money back to NHS

Mr Branson’s company sued the NHS last year after it lost out on an £82m contract to provide children’s health services across Surrey, citing concerns over “serious flaws” in the way the contract was awarded

PA

30/40 More than 700 fewer nurses training in England in first year after NHS bursary scrapped

The numbers of people accepted to study nursing in England fell 3 per cent in 2017, while the numbers accepted in Wales and Scotland, where the bursaries were kept, increased 8.4 per cent and 8 per cent respectively

Getty

31/40 Landmark study links Tory austerity to 120,000 deaths

The paper found that there were 45,000 more deaths in the first four years of Tory-led efficiencies than would have been expected if funding had stayed at pre-election levels. On this trajectory that could rise to nearly 200,000 excess deaths by the end of 2020, even with the extra funding that has been earmarked for public sector services this year.

Reuters

32/40 Long commutes carry health risks

Hours of commuting may be mind-numbingly dull, but new research shows that it might also be having an adverse effect on both your health and performance at work. Longer commutes also appear to have a significant impact on mental wellbeing, with those commuting longer 33 per cent more likely to suffer from depression

Shutterstock

33/40 You cannot be fit and fat

It is not possible to be overweight and healthy, a major new study has concluded. The study of 3.5 million Britons found that even “metabolically healthy” obese people are still at a higher risk of heart disease or a stroke than those with a normal weight range

Getty

34/40 Sleep deprivation

When you feel particularly exhausted, it can definitely feel like you are also lacking in brain capacity. Now, a new study has suggested this could be because chronic sleep deprivation can actually cause the brain to eat itself

Shutterstock

35/40 Exercise classes offering 45 minute naps launch

David Lloyd Gyms have launched a new health and fitness class which is essentially a bunch of people taking a nap for 45 minutes. The fitness group was spurred to launch the ‘napercise’ class after research revealed 86 per cent of parents said they were fatigued. The class is therefore predominantly aimed at parents but you actually do not have to have children to take part

Getty

36/40 ‘Fundamental right to health’ to be axed after Brexit, lawyers warn

Tobacco and alcohol companies could win more easily in court cases such as the recent battle over plain cigarette packaging if the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights is abandoned, a barrister and public health professor have said

Getty

37/40 ‘Thousands dying’ due to fear over non-existent statin side-effects

A major new study into the side effects of the cholesterol-lowering medicine suggests common symptoms such as muscle pain and weakness are not caused by the drugs themselves

Getty

38/40 Babies born to fathers aged under 25 have higher risk of autism

New research has found that babies born to fathers under the age of 25 or over 51 are at higher risk of developing autism and other social disorders. The study, conducted by the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai, found that these children are actually more advanced than their peers as infants, but then fall behind by the time they hit their teenage years

Getty

39/40 Cycling to work ‘could halve risk of cancer and heart disease’

Commuters who swap their car or bus pass for a bike could cut their risk of developing heart disease and cancer by almost half, new research suggests – but campaigners have warned there is still an “urgent need” to improve road conditions for cyclists. Cycling to work is linked to a lower risk of developing cancer by 45 per cent and cardiovascular disease by 46 per cent, according to a study of a quarter of a million people. Walking to work also brought health benefits, the University of Glasgow researchers found, but not to the same degree as cycling.

Getty

40/40 Playing Tetris in hospital after a traumatic incident could prevent PTSD

Scientists conducted the research on 71 car crash victims as they were waiting for treatment at one hospital’s accident and emergency department. They asked half of the patients to briefly recall the incident and then play the classic computer game, the others were given a written activity to complete. The researchers, from Karolinska Institute in Sweden and the University of Oxford, found that the patients who had played Tetris reported fewer intrusive memories, commonly known as flashbacks, in the week that followed

Rex

1/40 Thousands of emergency patients told to take taxi to hospital

Thousands of 999 patients in England are being told to get a taxi to hospital, figures have showed. The number of patients outside London who were refused an ambulance rose by 83 per cent in the past year as demand for services grows

Getty

2/40 Vape related deaths spike

A vaping-related lung disease has claimed the lives of 11 people in the US in recent weeks. The US Centre for Disease Control and Prevention has more than 100 officials investigating the cause of the mystery illness, and has warned citizens against smoking e-cigarette products until more is known, particularly if modified or bought “off the street”

Getty

3/40 Baldness cure looks to be a step closer

Researchers in the US claim to have overcome one of the major hurdles to cultivating human follicles from stem cells. The new system allows cells to grow in a structured tuft and emerge from the skin

Sanford Burnham Preybs

4/40 Two hours a week spent in nature can improve health

A study in the journal Scientific Reports suggests that a dose of nature of just two hours a week is associated with better health and psychological wellbeing

Shutterstock

5/40 Air pollution linked to fertility issues in women

Exposure to air from traffic-clogged streets could leave women with fewer years to have children, a study has found. Italian researchers found women living in the most polluted areas were three times more likely to show signs they were running low on eggs than those who lived in cleaner surroundings, potentially triggering an earlier menopause

Getty/iStock

6/40 Junk food ads could be banned before watershed

Junk food adverts on TV and online could be banned before 9pm as part of Government plans to fight the “epidemic” of childhood obesity. Plans for the new watershed have been put out for public consultation in a bid to combat the growing crisis, the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) said

PA

7/40 Breeding with neanderthals helped humans fight diseases

On migrating from Africa around 70,000 years ago, humans bumped into the neanderthals of Eurasia. While humans were weak to the diseases of the new lands, breeding with the resident neanderthals made for a better equipped immune system

PA

8/40 Cancer breath test to be trialled in Britain

The breath biopsy device is designed to detect cancer hallmarks in molecules exhaled by patients

Getty

9/40 Average 10 year old has consumed the recommended amount of sugar for an adult

By their 10th birthdy, children have on average already eaten more sugar than the recommended amount for an 18 year old. The average 10 year old consumes the equivalent to 13 sugar cubes a day, 8 more than is recommended

PA

10/40 Child health experts advise switching off screens an hour before bed

While there is not enough evidence of harm to recommend UK-wide limits on screen use, the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health have advised that children should avoid screens for an hour before bed time to avoid disrupting their sleep

Getty

11/40 Daily aspirin is unnecessary for older people in good health, study finds

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine has found that many elderly people are taking daily aspirin to little or no avail

Getty

12/40 Vaping could lead to cancer, US study finds

A study by the University of Minnesota’s Masonic Cancer Centre has found that the carcinogenic chemicals formaldehyde, acrolein, and methylglyoxal are present in the saliva of E-cigarette users

Reuters

13/40 More children are obese and diabetic

There has been a 41% increase in children with type 2 diabetes since 2014, the National Paediatric Diabetes Audit has found. Obesity is a leading cause

Reuters

14/40 Most child antidepressants are ineffective and can lead to suicidal thoughts

The majority of antidepressants are ineffective and may be unsafe, for children and teenager with major depression, experts have warned. In what is the most comprehensive comparison of 14 commonly prescribed antidepressant drugs to date, researchers found that only one brand was more effective at relieving symptoms of depression than a placebo. Another popular drug, venlafaxine, was shown increase the risk users engaging in suicidal thoughts and attempts at suicide

Getty

15/40 Gay, lesbian and bisexual adults at higher risk of heart disease, study claims

Researchers at the Baptist Health South Florida Clinic in Miami focused on seven areas of controllable heart health and found these minority groups were particularly likely to be smokers and to have poorly controlled blood sugar

iStock

16/40 Breakfast cereals targeted at children contain ‘steadily high’ sugar levels since 1992 despite producer claims

A major pressure group has issued a fresh warning about perilously high amounts of sugar in breakfast cereals, specifically those designed for children, and has said that levels have barely been cut at all in the last two and a half decades

Getty

17/40 Potholes are making us fat, NHS watchdog warns

New guidance by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), the body which determines what treatment the NHS should fund, said lax road repairs and car-dominated streets were contributing to the obesity epidemic by preventing members of the public from keeping active

PA

18/40 New menopause drugs offer women relief from ‘debilitating’ hot flushes

A new class of treatments for women going through the menopause is able to reduce numbers of debilitating hot flushes by as much as three quarters in a matter of days, a trial has found. The drug used in the trial belongs to a group known as NKB antagonists (blockers), which were developed as a treatment for schizophrenia but have been “sitting on a shelf unused”, according to Professor Waljit Dhillo, a professor of endocrinology and metabolism

REX

19/40 Doctors should prescribe more antidepressants for people with mental health problems, study finds

Research from Oxford University found that more than one million extra people suffering from mental health problems would benefit from being prescribed drugs and criticised “ideological” reasons doctors use to avoid doing so.

Getty

20/40 Student dies of flu after NHS advice to stay at home and avoid A&E

The family of a teenager who died from flu has urged people not to delay going to A&E if they are worried about their symptoms. Melissa Whiteley, an 18-year-old engineering student from Hanford in Stoke-on-Trent, fell ill at Christmas and died in hospital a month later.

Just Giving

21/40 Government to review thousands of harmful vaginal mesh implants

The Government has pledged to review tens of thousands of cases where women have been given harmful vaginal mesh implants.

Getty

22/40 Jeremy Hunt announces ‘zero suicides ambition’ for the NHS

The NHS will be asked to go further to prevent the deaths of patients in its care as part of a “zero suicide ambition” being launched today

Getty

23/40 Human trials start with cancer treatment that primes immune system to kill off tumours

Human trials have begun with a new cancer therapy that can prime the immune system to eradicate tumours. The treatment, that works similarly to a vaccine, is a combination of two existing drugs, of which tiny amounts are injected into the solid bulk of a tumour.

Nephron

24/40 Babies’ health suffers from being born near fracking sites, finds major study

Mothers living within a kilometre of a fracking site were 25 per cent more likely to have a child born at low birth weight, which increase their chances of asthma, ADHD and other issues

Getty

25/40 NHS reviewing thousands of cervical cancer smear tests after women wrongly given all-clear

Thousands of cervical cancer screening results are under review after failings at a laboratory meant some women were incorrectly given the all-clear. A number of women have already been told to contact their doctors following the identification of “procedural issues” in the service provided by Pathology First Laboratory.

Rex

26/40 Potential key to halting breast cancer’s spread discovered by scientists

Most breast cancer patients do not die from their initial tumour, but from secondary malignant growths (metastases), where cancer cells are able to enter the blood and survive to invade new sites. Asparagine, a molecule named after asparagus where it was first identified in high quantities, has now been shown to be an essential ingredient for tumour cells to gain these migratory properties.

Getty

27/40 NHS nursing vacancies at record high with more than 34,000 roles advertised

A record number of nursing and midwifery positions are currently being advertised by the NHS, with more than 34,000 positions currently vacant, according to the latest data. Demand for nurses was 19 per cent higher between July and September 2017 than the same period two years ago.

REX

28/40 Cannabis extract could provide ‘new class of treatment’ for psychosis

CBD has a broadly opposite effect to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main active component in cannabis and the substance that causes paranoia and anxiety.

Getty

29/40 Over 75,000 sign petition calling for Richard Branson’s Virgin Care to hand settlement money back to NHS

Mr Branson’s company sued the NHS last year after it lost out on an £82m contract to provide children’s health services across Surrey, citing concerns over “serious flaws” in the way the contract was awarded

PA

30/40 More than 700 fewer nurses training in England in first year after NHS bursary scrapped

The numbers of people accepted to study nursing in England fell 3 per cent in 2017, while the numbers accepted in Wales and Scotland, where the bursaries were kept, increased 8.4 per cent and 8 per cent respectively

Getty

31/40 Landmark study links Tory austerity to 120,000 deaths

The paper found that there were 45,000 more deaths in the first four years of Tory-led efficiencies than would have been expected if funding had stayed at pre-election levels. On this trajectory that could rise to nearly 200,000 excess deaths by the end of 2020, even with the extra funding that has been earmarked for public sector services this year.

Reuters

32/40 Long commutes carry health risks

Hours of commuting may be mind-numbingly dull, but new research shows that it might also be having an adverse effect on both your health and performance at work. Longer commutes also appear to have a significant impact on mental wellbeing, with those commuting longer 33 per cent more likely to suffer from depression

Shutterstock

33/40 You cannot be fit and fat

It is not possible to be overweight and healthy, a major new study has concluded. The study of 3.5 million Britons found that even “metabolically healthy” obese people are still at a higher risk of heart disease or a stroke than those with a normal weight range

Getty

34/40 Sleep deprivation

When you feel particularly exhausted, it can definitely feel like you are also lacking in brain capacity. Now, a new study has suggested this could be because chronic sleep deprivation can actually cause the brain to eat itself

Shutterstock

35/40 Exercise classes offering 45 minute naps launch

David Lloyd Gyms have launched a new health and fitness class which is essentially a bunch of people taking a nap for 45 minutes. The fitness group was spurred to launch the ‘napercise’ class after research revealed 86 per cent of parents said they were fatigued. The class is therefore predominantly aimed at parents but you actually do not have to have children to take part

Getty

36/40 ‘Fundamental right to health’ to be axed after Brexit, lawyers warn

Tobacco and alcohol companies could win more easily in court cases such as the recent battle over plain cigarette packaging if the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights is abandoned, a barrister and public health professor have said

Getty

37/40 ‘Thousands dying’ due to fear over non-existent statin side-effects

A major new study into the side effects of the cholesterol-lowering medicine suggests common symptoms such as muscle pain and weakness are not caused by the drugs themselves

Getty

38/40 Babies born to fathers aged under 25 have higher risk of autism

New research has found that babies born to fathers under the age of 25 or over 51 are at higher risk of developing autism and other social disorders. The study, conducted by the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai, found that these children are actually more advanced than their peers as infants, but then fall behind by the time they hit their teenage years

Getty

39/40 Cycling to work ‘could halve risk of cancer and heart disease’

Commuters who swap their car or bus pass for a bike could cut their risk of developing heart disease and cancer by almost half, new research suggests – but campaigners have warned there is still an “urgent need” to improve road conditions for cyclists. Cycling to work is linked to a lower risk of developing cancer by 45 per cent and cardiovascular disease by 46 per cent, according to a study of a quarter of a million people. Walking to work also brought health benefits, the University of Glasgow researchers found, but not to the same degree as cycling.

Getty

40/40 Playing Tetris in hospital after a traumatic incident could prevent PTSD

Scientists conducted the research on 71 car crash victims as they were waiting for treatment at one hospital’s accident and emergency department. They asked half of the patients to briefly recall the incident and then play the classic computer game, the others were given a written activity to complete. The researchers, from Karolinska Institute in Sweden and the University of Oxford, found that the patients who had played Tetris reported fewer intrusive memories, commonly known as flashbacks, in the week that followed

Rex

Dr Vanessa Saliba, consultant epidemiologist at PHE, explained that the”best protection against mumps and its complications” is two doses of the MMR vaccine.

“It’s never too late to catch up,” Dr Saliba said. “We encourage all students and young people who may have missed out on their MMR vaccine in the past to contact their GP practice and get up to date as soon as possible.”

Health secretary Matt Hancock outlined that vaccines are “the best form of defence against a host of potentially deadly diseases and are safer and more effective than ever before”.

“The rise in mumps cases is alarming and yet another example of the long-term damage caused by anti-vax information,” Mr Hancock said.

In addition to the swelling of facial glands, leading to a “hamster face” appearance, other symptoms of mumps include headaches, joint pain and a high temperature, the NHS states.

While there is no cure for mumps, it should disappear with one or two weeks.

This follows new rules outlined by the Professional Standards Authority (PSA) this week which have forbidden homeopaths from advising on vaccinations or suggesting homeopathy is a substitute for vaccines.

Instead homeopaths have been told to refer all patients to the NHS for further guidance on this matter if they want to retain professional accreditation. 

Sabrina Barr The Independent

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